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Sandestin, Florida Golf

 

 
Award Winning Florida Golf Resort

Award Winning Florida Golf Resort in South Walton

  • Top 75 Golf Resorts ~ Silver Medalist, Golf Magazine 2004,2006, 2008
  • Top 75 Golf Resorts ~ Golf Digest, 2006 
  • Four 1/2 Stars ~ Golf Digest "Places To Play" 2006
  • Gold Tee Award, Meetings & Conventions, 2002, 2003, 2004 - Meeting planners' choice for top golf and meeting hotels and resorts
  • Top 100 Women's Courses in the Country, Golf for Women
  • Best Golf in Northwest Florida, Birmingham magazine

Golf Courses in Destin, Florida

Golf Courses in Destin, Florida

Unleash your skill at the Destin, Florida golf courses that have won more than 30 awards from respected golf publications and organizations. Baytowne Golf Club, Burnt Pine Golf Club, Raven Golf Club and the Links Golf Club have been lauded as the best in Florida golf. Enjoy any or all of our four championship golf courses that offer the perfect blend of features and fun.

Destin Florida Golf Packages

Destin, Florida Golf Packages

Our conveniently designed Destin, Florida golf vacation packages are great for group golf trips, buddy trips, mancations, or for individuals and a snap to plan. A trip to Sandestin is not complete without a visit to one of our four award-winning Destin, Florida golf courses designed by Rees Jones, Robert Trent Jones Jr. and Tom Jackson.

Experience the complete Florida golf resort destination with one of our room and golf package deals. Choose from as little as two nights and two rounds to as many nights and rounds as you desire. Customize your Florida golf package to fit your rooming needs and the number of people in your group.

Destin Florida Golf Instruction

Sandestin Golf Academy

To create a learning environment that fits the needs of golfers at every skill level, the Sandestin Golf Academy and director of instruction Norm Tums uses the same technology available to PGA TOUR players. This helps students achieve a higher level of ability on the golf course. Weekly clinics, individual instruction, and special instructional events are available at the Sandestin Golf Academy.

For more information about Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort or to reserve your Florida golf package now, call 800.622.1038.


Golf Awards and Reviews


(click on the titles to expand)

+Florida Golf News (Raven Golf Course)

Florida Golf News voted Raven Golf Club at Sandestin Florida Golf Resort and the Dye Course at PGA Golf Club as the best two golf courses in Florida. Florida Golf News reveals why these courses are “Florida Favorites” in golf, reviewing their layouts.

The Golf Newspaper of America’s Premier Golf State
Vo. 5 No. 12 December 2000

“Raven, Dye courses best of new crop.” Florida Golf News (The Golf Newspaper of America’s Premier Golf State). Vo. 5 No. 12 (December 2000).

Raven, Dye courses best of new crop

Best new Florida course of 2000?
Florida Golf News has declared it a tie, with the winners being (in alphabetical order):

  • The Dye Course at PGA Golf Club, Port St. Lucie, FL
  • The Raven Course at Sandestin Resort, Destin, FL

Both are outstanding layouts at existing outstanding locations. The Dye course is the third at PGA Golf Club. The Raven is Sandestin’s fourth.

Both were playable long before opening, and were in prime condition at grand opening ceremonies. Both are at resorts, but are open for public green fee play.

The Raven is a classic big, beautiful, and traditional course, with good shot values throughout. Designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr., it is positioned as the logical venue for any serious tournaments Sandestin hosts.

A parallel in quality, but diametrically opposite in design, is the Dye course. It’s Pete Dye at his innovative and most daring best, building a course that is close to home, and is going t bear his name.

The course has dunes, waste areas, beautiful color contrasts, and some Dye-devilish greens. It does not have two of today’s conventional golf course basics: rough and cart paths.

Fairways are wide, but if your ball is beyond them, it’s gone, as there is no playable rough. There are no cart paths, but acres of coquina which come up to the edge of tees and facilitate driving a cart most anywhere. The result addresses one of the day’s major issues - faster play.

The tie resulted when a Florida Golf New panel was assigned to pick the best course which was completed before the beginning of this year’s Florida Favorites voting (July 1), but not soon enough to have had a full year’s exposure.

The year 2000 produced a banner crop of new courses, which made selection difficult. Many courses were considered including: Diamond Players Club, the Diplomat, Doral Great White, Lake Jovita, Lexington Oaks, Mizener CC, the Majors, Naples Lakes, South Hampton, Stonegate and Trump International.

The Raven Golf Club at Sandestin
9300 Hwy 98 W – Destin, FL 32550
Advanced Tee Times: 850-267-8211

+Golf Digest

This Destin, Florida golf course review by Ron Kaspriske was published in Golf Digest Magazine. Ron Kaspriske reviews Sandestin’s four championship golf courses—Raven Golf Club, Burnt Pine Golf Club, Baytowne Golf Club and The Links Course—commenting on Destin’s geography and offering insights about the layout of each golf course. Kaspriske, Ron. “Travel File : Destin, Fla.” Golf Digest. 1 November 2001.

The coastline of the Florida Panhandle is recognized as one of the oldest deposits of unconsolidated sediments in the world. The distinct absence of feldspars, amphiboles, pyroxenes and carbonate is noticeable, as is the abundance of medium – to fine – grained quartz.

When a geologist tells you this, simply nod your head in agreement. Unless you’re interested in coastal engineering, the scientific explanation for why Northwest Florida beaches are so inviting pales in comparison to rolling out of bed each morning and staring at the powder-white sand in the friendly community of Destin. You don’t need to know how da Vinci painted the Mona Lisa to like it.

Destin, 60 miles east of Pensacola, has been blessed with the type of beachfront property normally associated with places like St. Tropez. Locals refer to the region in less-dramatic terms (it’s either the “Redneck Riviera” or “L.A.,” as in “Lower Alabama”). But all it takes is one look at the sand and the surreal aquamarine hue of the Gulf of Mexico and you won’t mind parking your towel next to a guy named Joe Bob.

Along with being an annual stop for Spring Breakers and a long-term home for ex-military men (four military bases are nearby), Destin has found a niche as an out-of-the way golf destination. It’s on the map, but barely. And for most golfers, that’s just the way it ought to be.

If you want a quick, no-fuss way to visit Destin and play a variety of golf, you never really have to leave this full-service resort. The 72 holes at Sandestin (73 if you count the extra par 3 on the Raven) have a similar playability, but each course has its own personality. Burnt Pine, a Rees Jones course, is the most challenging. Water and marsh come into play on 13 holes, including the 212-yard 14th. And the unspoiled pine forests bordering the fairways will take care of any errant shot that the water doesn’t swallow. The Raven, designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr., is a fun resort course with wide landing areas off the tee but frustratingly undulated greens. The 604-yard seventh is a fantastic double dogleg cut through tall pines and palmetto bushes.

Even better than the course is its service. Golf pro Jeff Osenkowski’s “member-for-a-day” philosophy ends up making you feel like “big shot for a day.” Instead of course rangers, “player assistants” stop by every few holes and clean your clubs, offer shot advice and hand out – I’m not making this up – chilled, mango-scented towels. Put one of those suckers on your face and who cares how many balls you just dunked in the water.

Baytowne, a Tom Jackson design, used to be 27 holes, but nine of them were cannibalized in the making of the Raven. The remaining 18 are well-manicured and a lot less penal than the Raven and Burnt Pine. (Still, the 464-yard, uphill 13th is a monster.) Finally, The Links, a 1973 Jackson design, is a welcome way to finish off a day of golf. While not overly long, you can’t snooze your way through it, either. The 14th and 15th holes are framed by Choctawhatchee Bay, so it’s easy to get consumed by the view, especially when the occasional porpoise surfaces off shore.

+Golf Magazine

This Destin, Florida golf course review by Ron Kaspriske was published in Golf Digest Magazine. Ron Kaspriske reviews Sandestin’s four championship golf courses—Raven Golf Club, Burnt Pine Golf Club, Baytowne Golf Club and The Links Course—commenting on Destin’s geography and offering insights about the layout of each golf course. Kaspriske, Ron. “Travel File : Destin, Fla.” Golf Digest. 1 November 2001.

The coastline of the Florida Panhandle is recognized as one of the oldest deposits of unconsolidated sediments in the world. The distinct absence of feldspars, amphiboles, pyroxenes and carbonate is noticeable, as is the abundance of medium – to fine – grained quartz.

When a geologist tells you this, simply nod your head in agreement. Unless you’re interested in coastal engineering, the scientific explanation for why Northwest Florida beaches are so inviting pales in comparison to rolling out of bed each morning and staring at the powder-white sand in the friendly community of Destin. You don’t need to know how da Vinci painted the Mona Lisa to like it.

Destin, 60 miles east of Pensacola, has been blessed with the type of beachfront property normally associated with places like St. Tropez. Locals refer to the region in less-dramatic terms (it’s either the “Redneck Riviera” or “L.A.,” as in “Lower Alabama”). But all it takes is one look at the sand and the surreal aquamarine hue of the Gulf of Mexico and you won’t mind parking your towel next to a guy named Joe Bob.

Along with being an annual stop for Spring Breakers and a long-term home for ex-military men (four military bases are nearby), Destin has found a niche as an out-of-the way golf destination. It’s on the map, but barely. And for most golfers, that’s just the way it ought to be.

If you want a quick, no-fuss way to visit Destin and play a variety of golf, you never really have to leave this full-service resort. The 72 holes at Sandestin (73 if you count the extra par 3 on the Raven) have a similar playability, but each course has its own personality. Burnt Pine, a Rees Jones course, is the most challenging. Water and marsh come into play on 13 holes, including the 212-yard 14th. And the unspoiled pine forests bordering the fairways will take care of any errant shot that the water doesn’t swallow. The Raven, designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr., is a fun resort course with wide landing areas off the tee but frustratingly undulated greens. The 604-yard seventh is a fantastic double dogleg cut through tall pines and palmetto bushes.

Even better than the course is its service. Golf pro Jeff Osenkowski’s “member-for-a-day” philosophy ends up making you feel like “big shot for a day.” Instead of course rangers, “player assistants” stop by every few holes and clean your clubs, offer shot advice and hand out – I’m not making this up – chilled, mango-scented towels. Put one of those suckers on your face and who cares how many balls you just dunked in the water.

Baytowne, a Tom Jackson design, used to be 27 holes, but nine of them were cannibalized in the making of the Raven. The remaining 18 are well-manicured and a lot less penal than the Raven and Burnt Pine. (Still, the 464-yard, uphill 13th is a monster.) Finally, The Links, a 1973 Jackson design, is a welcome way to finish off a day of golf. While not overly long, you can’t snooze your way through it, either. The 14th and 15th holes are framed by Choctawhatchee Bay, so it’s easy to get consumed by the view, especially when the occasional porpoise surfaces off shore.